Countryman’s show at Balls Cross

Dogs of every type visited the countryman's day at Balls Cross but most were working breeds  PICTURE BY JUDITH TURNER
Dogs of every type visited the countryman's day at Balls Cross but most were working breeds PICTURE BY JUDITH TURNER

TERRIERS, lurchers, spaniels and labradors were the most popular dogs of the day at the countryman’s day at Balls Cross run by the Chiddingfold Leconfield and Cowdray Hunt Supporters Club.

The terrier show was a qualifier for the countryman’s weekly championship at the Midlands Game Fair and attracted every type of terrier from fell, lakeland and border to jack russell with special classes for dog belonging to hunt members or hunt servants.

Ted Harris qualified both his bitch, Minor, and his dog, Nelson for the championships and completed his day by also winning the puppy championship.

The lurcher show attracted equally as many varieties in height, coat and age.

The family dog show fulfilled the competitive needs of the other dog owners, either competing, amongst other classes, for 
the best veteran, best cross breed or even the best six legs.

In the scurries, run by the Leconfield Working Spaniel Club, gun dogs showed both their expertise and their inexperience at retrieving dummies at a distance, hidden under or over three increasingly high jumps made from straw bales.

The ferret arena showed ferrets could both be pets or useful working animals and the inexperienced were just as likely to be bitten by one as by the other.

A scarecrow competition had scarecrows based mainly on members of the hunt, and those in the know knew exactly which was meant to be who with accessories ranging from thermoses to cigarettes or labels asking ‘Where are we?’.

Stalls selling produce, country-themed cards and clothes, vintage tack, as well as the traditional beer tent, tombola, food and ice-creams completed the event which attracted a healthy number of country-minded people to raise funds for the Chiddingfold Leconfield and Cowdray Hunt.