Crowds flock to Petworth Fair

IN KEEPING with a 1,000-year-old tradition, neither rain nor wind could stop this year’s Petworth Fair from taking place.

The event, which promises fun for all ages, failed to disappoint, with lively, colourful and musical delights filling the Petworth air.

Lily Hancock, nine, Silvie Reynolds, nine, and Daisy Hervey, nine, enjoying the Fair.Picture by Kate Shemilt.C131579-7

Lily Hancock, nine, Silvie Reynolds, nine, and Daisy Hervey, nine, enjoying the Fair.Picture by Kate Shemilt.C131579-7

Hundreds turned out, and luckily the weather was kind to all the fair-goers.

And it wasn’t just weather conditions that improved – stallholders told organisers they were ‘extremely pleased’ with the day’s takings, and reported a better year than in 2012.

Entertainment was courtesy of Peter Kaufman, who came all the way from Guernsey with his 1930s dance organ.

Petworth historian Peter Jerrome labelled the fair another resounding success.

He said: “Peter Kaufman came from Guernsey because of the considerable tradition of our fair.

“We also had a change from previous years, having Carla Hendriks singing instead of the Petworth Town Band.”

Carla, accompanied by jazz musicians, provided the entertainment in the Leconfield Hall for everyone to enjoy.

“We were very impressed with the music.

“It is difficult when running a fair to know what to change and what not to change from one year to the next,” Peter added.

He highlighted the success of the usual stalls and said the exhibition of ‘Old Petworth’ was incredibly successful and is almost certainly set to return for next year’s event.

“It was a memorable experience for all, I think,” Peter said.

“All in all, even though we did have a spell of poor weather, it only lasted very briefly and did not seem to affect people’s enjoyment.

“Our town crier, Mike Hubbard, is not very well this year.

“It is absolutely impossible to imitate or replace him, so as a mark of respect we did not have our usual opening ceremony.

“This fair will continually evolve and the tradition must be kept going, but what direction it will 
take over the next 1,000 years, we cannot say.”