Fernhurst village life told in flowers

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The talents of 14 flower arrangers were needed for last weekend’s flower festival at St Margaret’s Church, Fernhurst.

The building was filled with displays on the theme of village life. The team worked on separate arrangements symbolising the Fernhurst Centre, village hall, village shops, sport, architecture, families, baptisms, food and drink, the Lunch Club, open spaces, the Good Companions, music, Art Group and the church itself.

A flower festival held at St Margaret's Church, Fernhurst, West Sussex, to celebrate 'village life' on the anniversary of their patron St Margaret of Antioch.'Picture - Flowers at the entrance to St Margaret's Church, entitled 'Fernhurst Centre', arranged by Derry Watchorn.

A flower festival held at St Margaret's Church, Fernhurst, West Sussex, to celebrate 'village life' on the anniversary of their patron St Margaret of Antioch.'Picture - Flowers at the entrance to St Margaret's Church, entitled 'Fernhurst Centre', arranged by Derry Watchorn.

Youth was depicted by several separate arrangements for Scouts and the youth club, and others united by ribbons from a maypole in the pulpit. The Art Group had a flower arrangement and a painting ‘in progress’ of the arrangement itself.

The horticultural society display of vegetables included some amazing garlic grown by Keith Harding, while the Lunch Club’s arrangement was of herbs and vegetables mixed in with flowers. Sport was a clever mix of Sussex’s home sport of stoolball along with tennis, cricket and football, all played enthusiastically in Fernhurst.

There was also an art exhibition put on by members of the art group in the new parish and community room where refreshments were being served. All showed different views of the church painted in different mediums from pen and ink to oils and water colour.

Many of those on sale during the weekend were snapped up.

Associated with the festival was a concert on Saturday evening by prize-winning harpsichordist Penelope Cave, Mixing her chosen pieces with spoken snippets of musical and gardening history, she played a selection including Bach, Sweelinck, Purcell, Rameau, Couperin, and Scarlatti.

All the pieces chosen had names or themes connected with gardens, flowers and birds to suit the occasion.

Penelope Cave has performed in concerts and festivals throughout Britain and Europe as well as recording and giving broadcasts on radio as varied as Belgian Iranian and Persian.

She is currently completing a PhD at the University of Southampton on 18th-century piano lessons in the English country house.