History marked at the Weald and Downland Open Air Museum

Crowds eager to see the timbres of the 18th Century Tindalls Cottage being re-erected
Crowds eager to see the timbres of the 18th Century Tindalls Cottage being re-erected
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HISTORY was made at the Weald and Downland Museum as the first timbres of an 18th century cottage were reconstructed.

The Open Air Museum’s ‘Raising the Frame’ event proved to be a real success, with over 1300 visitors travelling far and wide to catch an eagerly-awaited glimpse of the first timbres of Tindalls Cottage being re-erected.

The early 18th century home has been in storage since 1974, and the weekend of 22 and 23 September saw the unique historical building come to life at the Singleton museum.

It has been ten years since a dwelling has gone up at Weald and Downland and museum staff are welcoming the reconstruction with excitement and enthusiasm.

“Building conservation is what we are. It is very exciting as always to put on up a new exhibition building, and this building in particular as it has been in storage since 1974,” said Diana Rowsell, event organiser and head of learning at the Weald and Downland open air museum.

“What is exciting is that people are able to buy a tile or a peg and put their name on it. It is going to fill a gap in our collection of buildings and we have not got an 18 century building,” added Diana.

“It is a great success and we are absolutely thrilled with it,” Diana said.

Museum staff have predicted that the reconstruction process of the Tindalls Cottage will take around a year and there are keen hopes to have the project completed in readiness for Sussex Day taking place on June 16 2013.

There was plenty for visitors to see and do, with many trying their hand at peg making and younger guests had the opportunity to at putting together a timber frame.

To find out more about the Raising the Frame event and the Tindalls family, pick up a copy of this weeks Observer.