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Flooding danger spots in Midhurst

Flooding outside the White Horse pub, Easebourne Street on Christmas Day

Flooding outside the White Horse pub, Easebourne Street on Christmas Day

Residents of Pitsham Wood at Midhurst have been calling for action to end their flooding nightmare since 2008.

In 2007 they were trapped in their homes for two days when flood water from a blocked culvert backed into the road.

They were hit again in 2008, and last summer a family had to be rescued from their car when surface water suddenly gushed across the road, creating a lake.

Water flooded the road when underground culverts were unable to cope with the volume of water.

And Easebourne villagers called for urgent action at the start of the new year after yet more flooding in Easebourne Street and on North Mill Bridge.

In heavy rain, mud was being washed off the fields into the village, gushing into gardens because of inadequate underground culverts.

Easebourne Parish Council convened a meeting in January this year to address the flooding and silting-up problems. It was attended by representatives of West Sussex County Council, Chichester District Council, the Environment Agency, the Cowdray Estate, St Mary’s Church, Easebourne and the parish council.

A wide range of measures were agreed – some have already been undertaken and others will be carried out in the long term. A survey of the entire drainage system was also agreed.

The underlying cause of the flooding was heavy rain falling on saturated ground. The ground water level was at a 30-year high earlier this year.

Flooding at North Mill Bridge is being tackled by West Sussex County Council with additional openings in the walls of the bridge letting the water drain more easily into the River Rother.

Larger gullies and lowered pavements, together with re-shaping of the carriageway, were also planned to ease the flooding problem.

See this week’s Midhurst and Petworth Observer for our full Behind the Headlines flooding report (out November 28)

 

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