A27 Arundel Bypass: Two-month public consultation to begin this month

Members of the public have been given another chance to have their say on the A27 Arundel Bypass plans.

Wednesday, 5th January 2022, 4:20 pm
Updated Thursday, 6th January 2022, 9:51 am

In a public notice, issued this week, National Highways said it has a ‘duty’ to consult the local community about the proposed application.

A Statement of Community Consultation (SoCC) has been made available for inspection by the public. It can be viewed free of charge at www.nationalhighways.co.uk/a27arundel.

National Highways is set to undertake a statutory consultation and invite comments on the scheme from January 11 to 11.59pm on March 8.

Electronic and paper copies of all consultation documents will be available for inspection free of charge from January 11 to March 8 at a number of locations including; on the website; at document deposit locations; at consultation events; via post and via a virtual consultation room.

What is being proposed? 

In 2019, National Highways put forward six colour-labelled options for the A27 bypass that the public could have their say on.

Thousands responded to the consultation before it was announced that the ‘grey route’ had been picked as the one it will be hoping to build.

The proposed route for the Arundel Bypass. Picture: Highways England SUS-201019-110236001

The developer said it proposes to make an application for a development consent order authorising a new dual two-lane carriageway extending approximately eight kilometres, located to the south of the existing A27.

In the west, the scheme will tie-in approximately one kilometre east of the A27/A29 Fontwell (east) roundabout to the west of Arundel.

In the east, the proposed bypass will tie-in to the existing Crossbush junction, which will be reconfigured.

National Highways said the scheme ‘aims to improve safety, reduce congestion by increasing capacity and protect the quality of the surrounding environment’. 

The project has faced strong opposition, with campaigners claiming that the multi-million pound project would be ‘environmentally damaging’. They added that National Highways ‘plans to carve out the historic countryside’ for its eight-kilometre dual carriageway scheme’.

Others shared the view that ‘something needs to be done’ and ‘we do need to have a bypass’. Click here to read more

The project was delayed in November. The developers said this was so that they could ‘better present all our findings’, and explain how the scheme will be ‘safe, affordable, environmentally-led and meets its aim of reducing congestion’.

Children join the A27 bypass fight

A group of schoolchildren have joined the fight against the controversial A27 Arundel bypass.

Families met at Walberton Village Hall for an art morning with the theme, ‘Yes to Children. No to the A27 grey route’. The children were engaged with a story about the importance of adults listening to children.

The youngsters wanted their voices heard and demonstrated their opposition to the ‘grey route’ through creating a range of artwork that incorporated nature motifs. One 10-year boy said: ‘What are you going to DO next? How can we stop this?”

Parent Monika Davis, a member of Walberton Friends, organised the event. She said: “These words are still ringing in my ears, I see his eyes looking on me and want the answer. How can we preserve our beautiful countryside for our children?”

In 2019, National Highways put forward six colour-labelled options for the A27 bypass that the public could have their say on.

Thousands responded to the consultation before it was announced that the ‘grey route’ had been picked as the one it will be hoping to build.

Sarah Stone, whose children attended the art workshop, said the road was going to run ‘very close to three educational settings’. She called on MP Andrew Griffith to support their efforts against the plans with a view to ‘invest in a better public transport system’.

She added that the road would ‘bring pollution into a previously unspoilt village’.

To read about alternative proposals, visit the websites arundelbypass.co.uk and arundelalternative.org.