Overnight walk raises £24,000 for veterans

Walking with the Wounded charity founder, Ed Parker (left) and Roger Morgan-Grenville at the finish. 2017
Walking with the Wounded charity founder, Ed Parker (left) and Roger Morgan-Grenville at the finish. 2017

More than 30 people walked 50 miles through the night from London to Petworth on Friday to support ex-service men and women.

The 18-hour trek from the London Cenotaph to the Angel Inn has already raised £24,000 of its £25,000 target for charity Walking with the Wounded, with donations still coming in.

More than 30 people walked 50 miles home from the Cenotaph in London to Petworth in 18 hours to raise money and awareness for charity Walking with the Wounded.

More than 30 people walked 50 miles home from the Cenotaph in London to Petworth in 18 hours to raise money and awareness for charity Walking with the Wounded.

Tillington resident Roger Morgan-Grenville came up with the idea following a similar effort last winter.

He said: “A few friends said they would like to be involved if we did it again and this is what happened!

“We thought it was important to start at the Cenotaph with all its military significance and to challenge ourselves to walk a distance that few of us thought we could.”

He was joined on the walk by three Midhurst GPs, Dr Alex Macallum and Drs Tim and Rowena Hill, and seven sixth form students from Churchers College.

Charity CEO Ed Parker walked the whole route, as did amputee veteran Jaco van Gass, who served in the Afganistan conflict.

Businesses stepped in to support the walkers along the way, including Hungry Guest, Fitzcaines Ice Cream parlour, Noble and Stace and Budgens.

“We stopped every two hours to sort ourselves out and eat a bit,” said Roger. “We felt so supported by the local businesses who helped, and the people who

came out and drove vehicles to help the logistics.

“It was also a lot easier to accept the pain and tiredness knowing that over 500 individuals had supported us financially.”

The money raised will go directly towards a project to help ex-servicemen and women get back into secure work by providing training and advice for them

when they are at their most vulnerable.

On whether this would become an annual event, Mr Morgan-Grenville said: “You’ll need to ask me that when the blisters have died down.

“However, if there was enough support for it, it would be hard to walk away.”

Donations can still be made at www.justgiving.com/fundraising/roger-morgan-grenville12