Chichester District Council extends litter-busting partnership with East Hampshire

Lisa Jones from the council's Contract Services team, Sarah Parker and Terri Foster from the council's PR team, Cllr John Connor, Cabinet Member for the Environment and (front) Cllr Roger Barrow, Cabinet Member for Resident Services
Lisa Jones from the council's Contract Services team, Sarah Parker and Terri Foster from the council's PR team, Cllr John Connor, Cabinet Member for the Environment and (front) Cllr Roger Barrow, Cabinet Member for Resident Services

Chichester District Council has extended its litter-busting partnership with East Hampshire for another three years.

The two councils have been working together for more than a year as part of a trial scheme to reduce dog fouling and litter.

Following approval from the Chichester cabinet, East Hampshire will provide two litter enforcement officers three days per week, with the power to dish out on-the-spot fines for those caught dropping rubbish or not cleaning up after their pets.

Cabinet members were told that income from the fines would be used to cover the cost of the patrols. Once those costs were cleared, any extra fines would see £25 per ticket given to East Hampshire, with Chichester keeping the rest.

The cabinet also approved the revised Litter and FlyTip Action Plan, clearing the use £20,800 from reserves, £13,300 for a part-time project officer to deal with communication initiatives relating to fly-tipping and litter and £7,500 to pay for publicity resources.

Litter enforcement has been something of a gold-star subject for Chichester, with the Against Litter campaign being named best community relations campaign at the South of England and Channel Islands Pride awards.

Since being launched, Against Litter has seen 164 areas ‘adopted’ by residents, who pledged to keep them tidy, with 335 people signing up to the Green Dog Walkers scheme.

The success of the campaign was described as a ‘great success’ and ‘terrific’ for the council’s reputation by Roger Barrow, cabinet member for resident services.

He added: “More importantly, it’s actually helped to improve our district.”

Deputy leader Eileen Lintill said the campaign had made ‘a tremendous difference already’, adding: “We now have far more community clear-up days than we ever have before.”

The next big push will be to crack down on fly-tipping.

The council reported a rise in the crime, dealing with almost 1,000 cases in the past year.

Residents have been warned they could find themselves out of pocket if they don’t check the licence of companies employed to dispose of rubbish.

Cabinet members were told that, currently, if rubbish is dumped and traced back to a hapless customer, the council’s only option was to take them to court.

But new rules will allow local authorities to hand out fixed penalty notices instead.

Susan Taylor (Con, East Wittering) said: “Lots of us have extensions built and work carried out and perhaps have not in the past been aware of how important it is to check the licence.”