Stedham pupils explore the world of work

Children from Stedham School taking part in 'Young Enterprise' lessons. L to R: Tilly Raishbrook, Madeleine Mills from Young Enterprise and Lewis Blumlein. Copy from Juliet Page.   Photo: David Hill. SUS-150601-154016001
Children from Stedham School taking part in 'Young Enterprise' lessons. L to R: Tilly Raishbrook, Madeleine Mills from Young Enterprise and Lewis Blumlein. Copy from Juliet Page. Photo: David Hill. SUS-150601-154016001

STEDHAM Primary School is leading the way with an innovative scheme which gets pupils exploring the world of work.

Young Enterprise, the UK’s leading enterprise education charity, already runs schemes for A-level pupils who set up and run their own real companies.

Now a junior programme has been developed and Stedham pupils are the first in the Midhurst and Petworth area to take part.

“It is designed to inspire children of a younger age by letting them explore the working environment with teamwork and hands-on activities,” said school governor Juliet Page, who led the move to bring the scheme to the school.

“These include decision-making, finding out where money comes from, where goods and clothes come from and how they reach consumers.”

The Young Enterprise primary programmes are targeted at the four-to-ten-year age group and have already been run in Chichester.

Now governors of Stedham Primary School have booked three training days which started on Tuesday, led by Young Enterprise area manager Madeleine Mills.

Mrs Page said: “It is obviously an ‘add-on’ financially to the normal education programme, but an appeal was made to individuals in the Stedham community and surrounding area, and through their generosity more than half of the total cost was raised. Two local businesses, Henry Adams of Midhurst and Rotherhill Nurseries of Stedham, have also supported it.”

Madeleine worked with seven and eight-year-olds in the school’s Owls class.

“They built a model town centre together and put all the buildings on it, and then they learnt how a shop operates,” said Mrs Page.

“Then each child designed their own restaurant, including menus and decor. In the course of this they learnt about suppliers, where goods came from and simple costing and profit margins.”

The two following days will be for nine and ten-year-olds learning about world trade and 
a simpler session for the youngest pupils.